50 Top Education Hashtags for Teachers

50 Top Education Hashtags for Teachers

Modern educators understand that education at all levels involves interaction in and out of the classroom. Most schools K-College have implemented programs that require students to be active online. This is important for students learning the knowledge tools and methods of today, and how they impact traditional subject requirements.

Teachers are also being encouraged to start personal learning networks (PLNs). Most often, PLNs are created using accounts on platforms like Twitter. The power and visibility of an interesting keyword and hashtag builds active teacher/student networks. They also open pathways for many students and parents in becoming connected overall with institutions.
Hashtag and keyword saturation is the most vital element of a PLN. It is important to create keywords that create a following, but are not duplicated too often in search engines. PLN administrators should create keywords that can be identified through unique aspects of their curriculum, or that help followers discover concepts in non-overused contexts. One of the best ways to ensure effective keyword creation is to be as goal-oriented as possible. Another method is creating keywords that have a definite voice. Treat keyword creation in the same way an author would approach writing material that is genuinely their own.
Here is a helpful list of example Twitter-verse keywords that could be used effectively by teachers, students, and anyone relying on a PLN as part of an education program.

K-6th Grade:

#ABCand123
#FallFunFriends
#Supplies
#SuperKidsStart
#NewSchool
#EarnRecess
#1stYearSuccess
#CanWeCount
#PrimaryEd
#TrueDevelopment
#FUNdamentals
#EyeOnTests

Junior High:

#MiddleSchoolMaster
#GrowingSmarter
#RUpeertutor
#JRsRules
#FaveSubjectFocus
#STEMbasic
#WriteWell
#AskTheClass
#ExpectationsHS
#CoreAndMore
#ScienceExhibitsAndFollowThrough
#LunchAffectsLearning

College

#HowsYourWeekend
#NegotiateSyllabus
#MajorCircles
#CumLaudeTime
#ProfessorWho
#SuccessMinusSafetyNets
#ValidSleepStudies
#InternThis
#MoreLibraryTime
#EfficientAndSufficient
#DebtAlready
#WhoAreUHere
#FindPapers
#QuadEntanglement

Remember, effective hashtags and keywords are part identification, part uniqueness, and part context. The content surrounding keywords should make the purpose of their uses obvious. Vitality and imagination are vital to popular and helpful PLNs.

11 Amazing Facts About Education in America

11 Amazing Facts About Education in America

1. K-12 students in America come from more varied racial backgrounds than ever before.

2. Students today graduate from high school at the highest rate ever, with the lowest number of dropouts (5.9%) recorded in 2015. Black and Hispanic students in particular are graduating successfully in much higher numbers today than in 2000.

3. The University of Phoenix Online has 380,232 students, far more than any public university.

4. However, it only costs an average of $2,713 to attend a two-year college, which is a great way to save money and earn credit for a bachelor’s degree.

5. Vincennes University in Indiana offers a Bowling Management degree, allowing students to get their foot in the door in the bowling industry. Bowling management students learn about sales, the mechanism of pin setting, and operating bowling pro shops.

6. Harvard and Stanford turn away about half of the applicants who have received a perfect score on the SAT.

7. Students who attend more selective colleges end up earning about the same in their careers as students with the same ability level who attend less selective colleges.

8. Elementary school attendance was not compulsory in every state in the US until 1918. This came with the popularization of the idea that educated people can participate better in their society.

9. There are 480,000 public school buses transporting children to school in America every single day!

10. The United States hosts the most international students seeking a college degree. 17% of the 4.3 million international students in 2011 chose to study in America.

11. The number of high school graduates is expected to grow 10% in the period between 2011-2021, with Texas and Florida seeing larger increases.

10 Critical Issues Facing Education

10 Critical Issues Facing Public Education

Here are 10 of the most critical issues facing public education today:

1) Infrastructure – Not only is our public education programs in the process of crumbling so are the school buildings.

2) Quality Certified Skilled Teachers – With stagnant low teaching salaries in many areas and increasing violence on school grounds, this area of higher education is becoming less attractive as a vocation.

3 ) Antiquated Curriculum – Many of the facts we teach in public education are out of date as well as being verified that the information is just incorrect. With the accelerated technology in today’s world, we see the information we thought was correct being completely disavowed and yet it is still being taught.

4) The Loss Of Creative Expression – The only avenue provided to our children for the teaching and guidance of personal creative expression has been slowly budgeted out of our public education.

5) Poor Nutritional Food – The food our schools provide are mainly highly processed, high calorie, poorly chosen menus that are contributing to some health problems in our children.

6) Safety – Our children should not have to worry about being attacked violently while in school. A sound, working program of safety needs to be established.

7) Acceptable Social Behaviors In Public Schools – Bullying, Sexual Assault, Gender Profiling, Race Profiling, Nationality Profiling, needs to be addressed from an early stage of the child’s education.

8) Life Skills – Public education should be ground zero for children to be instructed in personal life skills such money, personal hygiene, and house cleaning.

9) Achieving Personal Goals – Each child needs to have the opportunity to discover their talents and shown the way to achieve future success.

10) Limited Testing – The focus needs to shift to individual progress rather than standardized testing for evaluating achievement.